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September 24th, 2014

SocialMedia_Sep22_CAs a business owner, chances are high that you are aware of social media and even have your business established on one or more services. While this is a great start, many businesses often struggle with how exactly they should be using social media to their advantage. If this sounds like you, here are three common ways your business can effectively use social media.

1. To be a resource for existing and potential clients

This approach is by far the most popular used by businesses of all sizes. The main idea here is that social media is used as essentially a two-way street where you can pass information about the company, products, and industry to your followers. In turn, they interact with the content and eventually start to turn to your profile and page when they are looking for information.

One of the best ways to be successful with this approach is to provide your followers with information about the company, facts, tips about your products and industry, and links to other relevant content.

By sharing content, users will generally interact with it more and begin to see your company as a reliable source of information. This often translates into enhanced brand awareness and potentially sales.

The downside with this approach however, is that it can be time consuming to constantly develop new content. Most companies eventually reach a point where what they produce and share is pretty much the same, and overall payoffs begin to decrease. One way around this is to work with professionals to come up with dynamic and different content.

2. To provide customer service/support

These days, when someone has a problem with a company's services or products, the first port of call for complaints is often social media, largely because it's the most convenient place to vent where you can get instant reactions.

It therefore makes sense to create support or customer service presence on these channels. Some companies have even taken to launching support-centric profiles, where customers can contact them about anything, from complaints to questions, and receive a personal answer. For many companies this is ideal because it eliminates the hassle of customers having to call a support line and dealing with automated machines.

This approach can prove useful for businesses because it often makes it easier to reach out to disgruntled customers and track overall brand satisfaction. The downside is that you will need someone monitoring services 24/7, and to respond in a timely manner which may be tough to do for many smaller businesses.

3. To sell something

There are an increasing number of businesses who have launched social media profiles with the intent of selling a product or service. The actual sales may not take place through social media but the information on these profiles and platforms channels potential customers to an online store or to contact a company directly. Social media's instantaneous nature makes for a tempting platform, especially when you tie in different advertising features and include content like coupons, and discounts.

While this hard sales line can be appealing to businesses, many users are seemingly put off of companies with profiles that only focus on selling via their platforms. The whole idea of social networking is that it is 'social'; this means real interactions with real people. Profiles dedicated only to trying to sell something will, more often than not, simply be ignored.

What's the ideal use?

One of the best approaches for small to medium businesses is to actually use a combined approach. Most people know that ultimately, businesses with a presence on social media are marketing something, but focusing solely on this could turn customers off.

A successful split that many experts have touted is the 70-20-10 rule. This rule states that you should make 70% of your content and profile focused on relevant information to your audience. 20% of content should be content from other people and 10% of content should be related to selling your products or services e.g., promotional.

If you want to use social media for support as well, it is a good idea to create a separate profile dedicated just to this end. If complaints are lodged or noticed using your main account, direct them towards the support account.

As always, if you are looking for help with your social media strategy, contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Social Media
September 23rd, 2014

Office365_Sep22_COffice 365, Microsoft's popular cloud-based productivity suite, is constantly growing in popularity, especially with small to medium businesses. However, as with many other software suites, the amount of data associated with Office 365 is also constantly growing and it can be tricky to keep track of all your data and connections. To help, Microsoft has introduced the Office Delve feature.

What is Office Delve?

The idea behind Office Delve is that it's a tool that helps business users get the most out of their data and information related to Office 365. According to Microsoft, Delve will allow you to:
  • Discover new information - Delve has been designed to show you information from different sources in Office 365 that you may find useful for what you are currently working on.
  • Discover what you need - Documents you have seen before, or have recently worked on, are highlighted and made easier for you to find, regardless of where they are stored. This makes it less taxing to find work you have been doing in the past, and continue from where you left off.
  • Discover new connections - Typing a name in Office 365 will allow you to see what a user is working on, their connections, and even connect with them to build relationships and share information.

How does it work?

In order to provide the information and data that users will likely find useful, Delve is powered by a tool Microsoft calls Office Graph. Graph maps the relationships between the various Office 365 users in your company, and the content/information related to them.

This 'map' is then used by Delve to provide users with what they need, when they need it. Content and information is displayed on a card-based screen, which can be found under the Delve tab in the main Office 365 launch screen.

Aside from content such as profile information, links to documents, or information, users can also see: Likes, views, comments, and tags, which brings a deeper social integration into Office 365.

Delve also orders content a number of different ways, including:

  • What you've recently worked on - Shows you content in card-form that you have recently opened or worked on.
  • Content that has been shared with you - Shows the content your colleagues have shared with you.
  • Content that has been presented to you - Shows content that colleagues have presented recently, or content that has been sent to you.
While this idea works great on the desktop, many Office 365 users access their systems from their mobile devices. Delve will also be available to mobile users. On your device you can browse the cards with files, swipe left or right on each card to view files, and even search for colleagues and view files they have shared with you and their recent activity.

When is Delve available?

Microsoft has noted that Delve is currently rolling out for businesses who have subscribed to the Office 365 Enterprise level plans (E1-E4) and have joined the first release program. Over the following months, it will roll out to all E1-E4 customers. In 2015, Microsoft has noted that they will introduce Delve to Business Essentials, Business Premium, Small Business, Small Business Premium and Mid Sized Business customers.

If you are looking to learn more about Delve, contact us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 23rd, 2014

Google_Sep22_CWhen looking for information on nearly anything and everything, the first place the majority of people turn to is Google. The thing is, there are so many results when we input a Google search that it can sometimes be a challenge to find what exactly you're looking for. Luckily, there are a number of tips and tricks you can employ to make finding what you need far easier. Here are seven:

Search inside one site only

Oftentimes, we are looking for an article, words, page, or even image from one site. If you simply search for it on Google, you may find the site right away, but you will also see results from other sites. To narrow down the results a little, try using the search operator site:.

When using site: followed by a web address in the search bar (without a space), Google shows results for that site at the top of the results list. So, if you are looking for an article that has the keywords: 'cloud technology' on CNN, you can enter: site:cnn.com cloud technology.

Search for results based on a page's title

If you are looking for a specific webpage, but don't know the site it is on, you can use the operator: intitle: followed by keywords. This tells Search to look for webpages that contain the keywords in the title.

For example, if you are looking for a webpage that has the title: five cloud tips, you can search for it by entering: intitle: five cloud tips. Note, be sure to add a space between the operator and the keywords/titles.

Do two searches at once

Using an OR operator between two keywords tells Search to show results for both of the keywords at the same time. This can be useful for when you are looking to quickly compare two different ideas or topics.

The key to making this operator work is to make sure that OR (in capital letters) is between the two terms you are looking for, and separated by a space on both sides.

Exclude certain results or keywords

With many Google searches you will often see results for local businesses with a presence on Google first, or results related to your local area. While these can be useful, when you are looking for non-local results, it can take time to sort through these findings.

If you see that there are a number of results with keywords or terms that you are not interested in, then put a - (minus) in front of the term (without a space) e.g., -term, and Search will not show results containing that word.

Quickly find sites that link to yours (or another)

One of the key components of successful SEO (Search Engine Optimization) is link building - the concept of increasing links to and from your site. With Search's various updates, Google is constantly changing the way sites are ranked and displayed in results. Businesses with websites need to ensure that the links they are using to direct to other content, or to bring people into their site are legitimate.

One quick way to see who links to your site is to use the Search operator: link:site.com. Simply enter link:yoursite.com, and Google will display results for all other sites and content that contain links to your site.

Fill in the blank searches

Looking for something where you know the first and last part of say the name, title, sentence, etc? You can use the Search operator * to help. The * (asterix) functions as what is called a wildcard, or unknown, operator. When used, it tells Search that you don't know the words that are missing, and that you want Search to try and fill in the results.

Use quotes to search for exact terms

The way Search works is that when a set of keywords are entered with spaces, Search will return results that contain the words either separately or together in any order. If you know exactly what you are looking for, you can add double quotes (") around the terms.

By using double quotes, Google will show results that only contain those exact words, in that order. While this is useful, longer sentences in quotes will return fewer results, so if you aren't finding what you are looking for, try reducing the number of words inside the quotes.

If you are looking to learn more about Google Search, contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 19th, 2014

Security_Sep15_CMany businesses are turning to the cloud in an attempt to avoid data breaches, which are growing in number as well as intensity. Still, what some businesses might not be aware of is the fact that there are certain parts of the cloud that point to an increased data breach risk. However, this doesn’t have to end in a mess as there are measures you can take to prevent a cloud-and-data security breach.

The cloud opens up some great tech advancements for businesses and is here to stay. However, as with all tech developments, you need to also be aware of any vulnerabilities and security issues as they change and develop at the same time too. If you use the cloud and want to proactively prevent cloud-and-data security breaches then here are five tips to follow:

  1. Know your cloud apps: Get a comprehensive view of the business readiness of apps and which ones render you more or less prone to a breach. Ask yourself these questions: Does an app encrypt data stored on the service? Does it separate your data from that of others so that your data is not exposed when another tenant has a breach? The idea here is to know exactly what each cloud service employed offers and how your company uses them.
  2. Migrate users to high-quality apps: Cloud-switching costs are low, which means that you can always change and choose apps that best suit your needs. If you find ones that don’t fit your criteria, take the time to talk to your vendor or switch; now more than ever you have choices, and the discovery process in step one will help you find out what these are.
  3. Find out where your data is going: Take a look at your data in the cloud. Review uploads, downloads, and data at rest in apps to get a handle on whether you have potential personally-identifiable information (PII), or whether you simply have unencrypted confidential data in or moving to cloud apps. You wouldn’t want cloud-and-data breaches with this critical data.
  4. Look at user activities: It’s important to understand not only what apps you use but also your data in the context of user activity. Ask yourself: From which apps are people sharing content? According to tech news source, VentureBeat, one-fifth of the apps they tracked enable sharing, and these aren’t just cloud storage apps, but range from customer-relationship management to finance and business intelligence. Knowing who’s sharing what and with whom will help you to understand what policies to best employ.
  5. Mitigate risk through granular policy: Start with your business-critical apps and enforce policies that matter to your organization in the context of a breach. For example, block the upload of information covered by certain privacy acts, block the download of PII from HR apps, or temporarily block access to vulnerable apps.
The key to preventing a cloud-and-data security breach lies in careful attention to your cloud applications and user activity. Analyzing your apps and looking into user activities might be time consuming, but the minimization of cloud-and-data security breaches makes this task worthwhile. Looking to learn more about today’s security? Contact us and let us manage and minimize your risks.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Security
September 16th, 2014

GoogleApps_Sep15_CIt is understandable that sometimes you can feel that your privacy is being invaded when someone asks to use your personal computer. After all, this is where a lot of personal messages, information and data is stored. There may also be history entries, bookmarks and instant messages you don't want someone else to be looking at. With Google’s Chrome, profile lock, a new feature that is being tested, you can have greater peace of mind that your privacy is being protected.

What is Chrome profile lock?

Chrome profile management system, as it is also known, allows you to lock your browser profile session, in a similar way to locking your entire desktop. What this means is that another user can still access apps and files stored locally, but won’t be able to sift through your personal data, bookmarks and personal apps because they will be using a Guest version of Chrome.

This eliminates the hassle of you having to quit your session or having to go through the process of creating a separate user account for the borrower to protect them from viewing your information.

How to lock your Chrome session?

  1. Open Chrome and in a new tab enter the following address: chrome://flags.
  2. Press Ctrl+F and search for Enable new profile management system.
  3. Click on the link to enable the feature (change default to enabled).
  4. Finally, press the Relaunch Now button at the bottom of the browser window.
When Chrome comes back you’ll see a drop down button with your Google account name in the title bar at the top-right of the screen. Click on this to reveal your user card, then click on the lock icon when you want to drop password-protection over your current Chrome activities.

Once locked, the browser will vanish and the User Manager window will appear along with the Browse as Guest option for when someone else is using your computer. Keep in mind that the User Manager window will remain active until you re-enter your password; even after restarting Chrome or rebooting the operating system.

Be aware that this new Chrome profile management system is not yet enabled by default and is still in the testing phase on Windows, Mac and Linux. Looking to learn more about Google’s applications? There are lots of ways that we can help you and your business, so get in touch.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 16th, 2014

Facebook_Sep18_CFacebook is one of, if not the most popular sites on the Web. With over 1.28 billion active (users who log in once a month) users it's hard to ignore this social media platform. However, the sheer volume of users makes it a tempting target for spammers and hackers. From posts with links to malicious content to fake apps, you should be aware of the common posts and tactics used by hackers.

1. Statistics on Profile visits

Spend enough time on Facebook and you will likely see this type of post on your Timeline. The post usually shows itself off as an app that allows users to see who has been viewing their personal profile, or the statistics related to profile views. There is also a link to click to either go to a site or install an app.

These posts look legitimate, but Facebook doesn't actually allow these apps, so clicking on them usually leads to malicious apps or sites. As some of these posts contain links to Facebook apps, you will be asked to allow the app permissions like access to personal data, friends lists, etc. These apps won't work, but they do give the developer access to your information which could then be used to start other malicious hacks.

2. Changing the color of your Profile

With the wide number of apps, devices, and other tech available to us, developers are often keen to offer users the ability to customize how their app looks. For example you may have applied your own themes or changed icons with your browser. Therefore, it makes sense that some users might want to change the color of their Facebook Profile from the standard blue that everyone uses.

There are apps out there that supposedly allow you to do this. However, Facebook doesn't allow users to customize the color of their Profile - it's blue for everyone. Therefore, the apps and links that supposedly allow you to change the color are fake and likely related to spam or malicious content. It's best to not click on the links in these posts, or install apps that say they allow you to do this customization.

3. Check if a friend has deleted/unfriended you

This post seems to come up every six months or so on Facebook. Like the statistics on Profile visits, apps claiming to allow you to check if you have been unfriended are fake. The biggest giveaway that this is a fake app or post is the wording. When someone doesn't want to be connected with you on Facebook, they will 'unfriend' you, not 'delete' you as these posts often claim. Needless to say, it is best to refrain from clicking on these links and apps.

4. Free stuff from Facebook

If you are a Facebook fan then you might like a free Facebook t-shirt, hat, water bottle, etc. There is a known post that shows up from time-to-time declaring that Facebook is giving away free stuff, and that if you click on the link in the post you too can get hold of some freebies.

Facebook does not usually give away stuff via network posts. Those people you see walking around with Facebook apparel usually either work for the company, had it printed themselves, or attended a Facebook event. Therefore, if you see these posts, don't click on the link.

5. Revealing pics or videos of celebrities

With all the recent leaks of celebrity photos and videos, you can be sure that the number of posts popping up on you News Feed with links to these types images and videos will become increasingly popular.

Not only is this obscene, the posts are 100% fake. Clicking on any of the links will likely take you to a site with 'files' that you need to download. The issue is, these files are actually malware and can pose a serious security risk.

As a general rule of thumb: Don't click on any links in posts connected to celebrities and revealing images or videos.

What can I do about these posts?

These tips are mainly for individual Facebook users as this is whom hackers and spammers are targeting the most. How is this an issue for your business? Well, if an employee is browsing Facebook at work and clicks on one of the links in posts like the ones above, there is a good chance they could introduce malware into your systems and networks.

Therefore, you might want to educate your employees about common Facebook security threats like the ones above. Beyond this, you should encourage everyone to take the following steps when they do come across content like this:

  1. Click the grey arrow at the top-right of the post.
  2. Select I don't want to see this.
  3. Click Report this Post.
This will ensure that the post itself is deleted and that the content is reported to Facebook for followup. Usually, if there are enough reports, Facebook will look into the content and likely ban the user.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 9th, 2014

Office365_Sep08_CCloud-based solutions that are public oriented, such as Microsoft's Office 365, offer a wide variety of features that the majority of business users want and need. As a result, the service tends to look the same for all and the ability to customize how Office 365 looks has often been a requested feature. In an effort to make the cloud-based suite more useful, Microsoft has recently announced the ability to customize Office 365.

Coming soon to Office 365 (if not already): Themes

In early September, Microsoft announced that in the following weeks the company would be rolling out a couple of new options that will allow businesses to personalize the look of Office 365. In fact, there are not one, but two new personalization options available for Office 365 users with business subscriptions.

Option 1: Company-wide custom themes

The idea of establishing company brand is not a new concept to business owners, who realize that one of the factors to success is creating positive brand recognition amongst stakeholders, including employees. One of the best ways to achieve this is to include identifiable visuals and colors repeated in as many places as possible. Almost every company has colors that they use as part of their corporate image and brand identity.

To help cement your brand with your employees, you can now customize the theme of Office 365 so that the theme is applied to all users in your organization. When it comes to customizing your theme Microsoft has noted that you will be able to:

  • Pick the color scheme, which includes a base color and text/icon colors. Set the base as blue for example, and the menu bar across the top will be that color. Set the text as yellow and all icons/text in the menu bar will also be yellow.
  • Set the color of the Office 365 logo. You can pick up to three colors for the Office 365 logo.
  • Upload a custom logo. You can upload your company logo and have it applied to the top-left of all Office 365 menu bars.
  • Make the logo a clickable link. Once you set a logo, you can also make it clickable by adding a custom URL. When a user clicks the logo, they will be taken to the predefined URL.
If you would like to apply your company's brand to Office 365, and have it automatically applied to all users in the company, you will need to be the admin, or to log in as an administrator. Once you are logged on, click on Admin from the main Office 365 screen. Then, click on your company's hyperlink located at the top-right of the Admin screen (right below the menu bar) and select Custom theming.

In the screen that opens, you will be able to set your desired theme, and when you are finished simply hit Save and the theme should be applied.

Option 2: Personalized themes

While company users can set a theme related to their brand, individual users in the organization can also select their own theme from a list of 22 provided by Microsoft. Each theme changes:
  1. The top navigation bar color scheme
  2. Menu colors
  3. Background
  4. Office 365 logo colors
You can change the theme of Office 365 by logging into your account, pressing the Settings cog at the top-right of the screen and clicking Change theme. Once you have selected a theme you like, press Save and it should be applied immediately.

If you are looking to learn more about Office 365 and how you can get the most out of it, contact us today for a chat.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 9th, 2014

GoogleApps_Sep08_CAny Google user quickly comes to realize that the tech giant is not one to sit still. It seems like they are introducing a new feature or update on a near daily basis, especially when it comes to Drive which has seen it's fair share of changes over the past few months. If you have logged into Drive recently, you may have noticed a pop-up notifying you about a new site for Docs, Slides, and Sheets.

About the recent change to Drive

In order to make users' lives easier, Google has decided to kind of spin off their productivity apps. What do we mean by this? Well, the company has announced that they are launching individual sites for Docs, Sheets, and Slides. Now, instead of going to Drive to open or create a new Doc, you can do so by going to the Docs site.

Each of the three major productivity apps - Docs, Sheets and Slides - now has their own site, and can be accessed here:

This isn't a full spin off because your files created and edited using the individual app sites are still stored on Drive. The idea here is that this separation is supposed to make it easier for users to interact with each different productivity apps and related files.

When will this shift happen?

Google has started to alert Drive users to the impending switch and has indicated that Docs will be the first to move over to the new system. That being said, you can actually access the three different apps now, or you can still use Drive to create your files for the time being, just be prepared for a shift in the near future.

Getting around the new sites

Each of the three new sites has pretty much the same layout, with the following elements being the most useful:
  • Plus button at the bottom-right: Pressing this will open a new Docs, Sheets or Slides file.
  • Three horizontal bars at the top-left: Will slide a menu in from the left with the options to open either the Docs, Sheets, or Slides sites, along with Settings and Drive.
  • File sorting icons at the top-right: The four horizontal lines button will switch files in between either List or Grid view. The button with A to Z is for sorting options which will allow you to configure how related files are sorted.
  • Folder icon at the top-right: Clicking this will open the File picker which will allow you to quickly navigate to different folders on your Drive, and also upload other files such as Microsoft Office documents or PDFs.
If you are a heavy user of one of the Google Drive apps, then these sites will likely be a welcome addition. The same can be said for those who use the mobile apps which were released earlier this year.

Looking to learn more about Google's systems? Get in touch and make a positive tech change today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 4th, 2014

Security_Sep02_CWhat do you do when your smartphone needs to be charged but your charger is not at hand? A handy solution is to turn to a public charging kiosk. But what you might not be aware of is the fact that this can lead to juice jacking of your smartphone. To avoid this security threat, it’s time to get a comprehensive view of what juice jacking is and how you can protect your smartphone from it.

What’s juice jacking?

Regardless of the kind of smartphone you have, whether it’s an Android, iPhone or BlackBerry, there is one common feature across all phones: the power supply and the data stream pass over the same cable. This setup allows for juice jacking during the charging process whereby user access is gained on your phone by leveraging the USB data/power cable to illegitimately access your phone’s data and/or inject malicious code onto the device.

The attack can be as simple as an invasion of privacy, wherein your phone pairs with a computer concealed within the charging kiosk and information such as private photos and contact information are transferred to a malicious device. However, on the other hand, it can also be as invasive as an injection of malicious code directly into your phone. According to security researchers at this year’s Black Hat security conference, your iPhone can be compromised within one minute of being plugged into a harmful charger.

Exposure to a malicious kiosk can also create a lingering security problem even without the immediate injection of malicious code. Once a device is paired to a computer, it can access a host of personal information on the device, including your address book, notes, photos, music, sms database, typing cache, and even initiate a full backup of your phone, all of which can be accessed wirelessly at anytime.

How do I avoid it?

The most effective precautions center around simply not charging your phone using a third-party system. Here are some tips to help you avoid using public kiosk charger:
  • Keep your devices topped off: Make it a habit to charge your phone at your home and office when you’re not actively using it or are just sitting at your desk working.
  • Carry a personal charger: Chargers have become very small and portable, from USB cables to power banks. Get one and throw it in your bag so you can charge your phone anytime you’re at the office or while on-the-go if you use a power bank.
  • Carry a backup battery: If you’re not keen on bringing a spare charger or power bank, you can opt to carry a full spare battery if your device has a removable battery.
  • Lock your phone: When your phone is truly locked as in inaccessible without the input of a pin or equivalent passcode, your phone should not be able to be paired with the device it’s connected to.
  • Power the phone down: This technique only works on phones on a model-by-model basis as some phones will, despite being powered down, still power on the entire USB circuit and allow access to the flash storage in the device.
  • Use power only USB cables: These cables are missing the two wires necessary for data transmission and have only the two wires for power transmission remaining. They will charge your device, but data transfer is made impossible.
Even the tiniest detail like charging your phone from a kiosk charger could affect the security of your device. While there are many substitutes to using a third-party system, ultimately the best defense against a compromised mobile device is awareness. Looking to learn more about today’s security and threats? Contact us today and see how we can help.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Security
September 2nd, 2014

GoogleApps_Sep02_CGoogle has a wide variety of apps and services, all of which are useful in one way or another. One thing they do better than most any other company however is search. Many of us use search operators on Google Search, but did you know that there are search operators you can use with Google Drive when you are looking for files or folders? Here are four.

Searching for files on Drive

Before we look into the different search operators you can use to find files on Drive, we should clarify that these operators are to employ in the search bar, which is located at the top of the Drive page. If you want to search for a file this works in the same way as the Google Search bar on google.com, only this bar focuses on Drive files, and anything related to Drive.

To use the operators listed below, simply click on the bar that says Search Drive and enter the operator along with the search term, or name of the file/item/keyword you are looking for. For best results you should put the operator before the keyword, however Google also allows users to insert it after the keyword.

1. title:

Sometimes when you are looking for a document, you want to search for the title only, but because of the way Drive's search works, if you enter a keyword it will search for all files that contain that particular word. This means that if you are looking for a document based on its title, you will also see results for documents that contain that keyword too. By using the title: operator you can filter results so that only documents that contain the keyword in the title are displayed.

For example, if you are looking for a document that you know has the words "TPS report" in the title, you would enter: title: "tps report". If you are looking for a title but know only a few keywords that aren't next to each other, you can enter the keywords with quotations around each of the keywords. This will tell Drive to search for files that contain each of the separate keywords in the title.

2. type:

Chances are that with Drive you have created and stored more than just one type of file. Many of us use it to store multiple file types, which can make finding the file you are looking for more challenging.

If you know the type of document you are searching for, enter the operator type: followed by the file type (spreadsheet, document, pdf, presentation, drawing, image, and video) and then add keywords to direct Drive to only display these filtered, related results.

So, if you are looking for a presentation with the keywords "sales team" then you would enter: type:presentation "sales team". Be sure that when you are looking for a file type, there is no space between the operator and the type of file you are searching for.

3. owner:

Drive is highly collaborative and files that you have access to may not be stored on My Drive, or even owned by you. If you are looking for files that you know are owned by other team members try using the owner: operator.

When using this, Drive will present files owned by the email address that you enter beside the operator, and which have been shared with you. If you are looking for a file that is shared with you/on your Drive that is owned by sally@company.com, then you would enter: owner:sally@company.com. You can add keywords before or after the operator (as long as they are separated by a space) to filter results down even further.

4. is:starred

One of the more useful Drive features for users who deal with a large number of files is the ability to star important ones. By simply clicking on Starred on the left-hand horizontal menu bar, you can view all of your starred files. The issue many run across however is that that list does grow over time, making it less useful in finding important files - which kind of defeats the purpose of the feature in the first place.

If this has happened to you, then you can easily search for starred files by entering: is:starred along with keywords in the search field. This will tell Drive to only search for files that contain the keywords and are starred.

These are just a few of the more useful search operators available to Drive users. Do you have one you can't live without? Let us know! And, if you have any questions about Drive for your office, please contact us.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.